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Students, staff receive one of a kind trauma training at Bellmont High School

Students, staff receive one of a kind trauma training at Bellmont High School

Posted: Apr 17, 2018 1:52 PM
Updated: Apr 18, 2018 9:10 AM

DECATUR, Ind. (WFFT) - "Stop The Bleed" is a training course developed in the wake of the Columbine High School shooting designed to teach people how to apply tourniquets and dressing to stop or slow down bleeding.


Students and staff at Bellmont High School took part in the training course offered through Lutheran Hospitals Trauma Services.

Bellmont principal Kim Hiatt says her students wanted this training after hearing about the Parkland School shootings.

“Our students actually reacted to that school shooting with wanting more information about what can we do to react, to prevent, to anticipate a negative event,” Hiatt said when asked why she brought the training to the school.

The training you typically see in those type of situation is see something, say something. However, this training is encouraging students now that if you see something, do something, if it's safe.

There are many different situation where these students might use this training, not just in a school shooting situation according to Dr. Prad George, the Trauma Medical Director for Lutheran Hospital. He said, “we actually have a lot of incidents where this is actually useful, these basic, mini-control techniques are useful. With our farm accidents, with our industrial injuries, and with workplace accidents. So, this is a skillset that everybody can be armed with that can save a life.”

The training was unique because the school was joined by police, fire, and ems personnel to bring the training to life for students like August Tharp and Allyson Mcbride, who got a chance to practice applying a tourniquet.

When asked about her training, Tharp said, “I thought it was cool and it was super simple. Wasn’t anything difficult. I feel like anyone can do it. Even if you have like a middle schooler who is there and you’re conscious enough to explain to them how to do it, they would be able to do it.”

McBride is glad the school brought the training to them because she thinks it's something that could be really useful. “Before now, I never really knew what to do step by step, but now they gave me a list of things to do, things to check for. So, I think I’d actually be able to do it in a situation,” Mcbride said.

Principal Hiatt believes this training was a good experience for everybody, saying “my hope is this planted a seed that no matter what may happen, if there is physical trauma, they will have some idea that they need to respond, they may respond and an idea of how to respond.”

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