The extreme ways people protect themselves from hacks

When Dave Weinstein worked in a government job a few years back, he took an extreme measure to keep his data secure from hackers. He and his co-workers physi...

Posted: Nov 28, 2018 10:54 AM

When Dave Weinstein worked in a government job a few years back, he took an extreme measure to keep his data secure from hackers. He and his co-workers physically removed the hard drives from their computers and locked them up in a safe at the end of the day.

While that level of security isn't always necessary, the possibility of having your credit card stolen or misued, suffering from identity theft or getting hacked is on the rise. And people like Weinstein are finding creative ways to protect their passwords and devices.

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg famously covers up his laptop's webcam with a sticker, a practice that is increasingly common, and most people now know not to use the same password for all their accounts. Some security experts are taking personal protection even further.

Now the vice president of threat research at Claroty, an industrial cybersecurity company, Weinstein uses at least two different identity-theft protection subscriptions, such as Experian, Equifax or Lifelock, to ensure that his information isn't being compromised or sold online.

These services monitor financial data such as credit card information, loan applications and bank accounts to ensure that information isn't being compromised or sold online.

Weinstein's security practices are far from rare. Wendy Nather, director of advisory chief information security officers at Duo Security, has a clever trick to thwart would-be hacks.

"I use a different credit card to make automated [bill] payments online than I do for purchases on the street," Nather said.

Nather keeps things separate so that if her everyday credit card is breached, she doesn't have to change the card for each of her automated payments. It also minimizes the potential damage a hacker can do because it's not tied to any important online accounts.

Others focus on compartmentalizing areas of their lives such as using different physical computers for work and personal use, or create separate digital accounts for working, shopping and banking.

Nather said she's even known people who will only do certain tasks on paper and keep it locked in a safe.

Kevin Kosh, a partner at CHEN PR which represents tech companies, uses a Google voice number -- not his mobile number -- to receive two-factor authentication texts. Two-factor authentication requires using a one-time code to access accounts, in addition to a password.

His logic is that if you ever change your SIM card — like when you get a new phone or change carriers — there's no connection to your sensitive information.

Nather and Weinstein are also big advocates of keeping mobile software up to date for bug fixes and security patches.

Weinstein said he's known some people who completely eliminate email due to the high risk of phishing and malware.

Although that's not a reasonable fix for most people, he noted one area in which people could adopt a more cautious approach is with home routers.

"Most people get them through their internet service provider and they don't necessarily prioritize security," Weinstein said. "Consider purchasing a home router as you would any other technology that you care about. It's more than just giving you wireless access. Security needs to be part of the equation."

These routers are easily hacked and can provide access to sensitive information because most people feel safe using computers on a protected network.

But Weinstein cautioned against taking every extreme security precaution, such as using personal servers for email.

"It's the thing people do to be secure and then it ends up backfiring," he said. "Unless you have a state-of-the-art facility and 24/7 operation center backing it, you can't compare the level of security to something as commoditized as Gmail."

Nather agrees, noting "if you're sufficiently paranoid, you can never prove to yourself that you're safe."

She said there are some things that should be done off the bat, such as 2-factor authentication and loading passwords into a password manager. But "unless you know you're at high-risk of being targeted, say a government official or high-placed executive, you're probably not going to be."

Indiana Coronavirus Cases

Data is updated nightly.

Cases: 764448

Reported Deaths: 13965
CountyCasesDeaths
Marion1049701803
Lake567981029
Allen42685698
St. Joseph37253568
Hamilton37131426
Elkhart29699470
Tippecanoe23347230
Vanderburgh23106404
Porter19538327
Johnson18755391
Hendricks18012321
Madison13463345
Clark13450198
Vigo12789255
LaPorte12533224
Monroe12494178
Delaware11100198
Howard10612237
Kosciusko9736123
Hancock8707149
Bartholomew8235157
Warrick8031157
Floyd7975181
Grant7337181
Wayne7222201
Boone7145105
Morgan6886142
Marshall6323116
Dubois6267118
Cass6083111
Dearborn598578
Noble595790
Henry5939111
Jackson514677
Shelby509097
Lawrence4901127
Gibson460696
Montgomery454492
Clinton453555
DeKalb451585
Harrison450576
Whitley414745
Huntington411781
Steuben409560
Miami404073
Jasper399455
Knox387091
Putnam383762
Wabash367383
Adams351656
Ripley350471
Jefferson340486
White338954
Daviess3084100
Wells302281
Greene292285
Decatur291493
Fayette285864
Posey280435
Scott278058
LaGrange276972
Clay273048
Washington252437
Randolph247083
Jennings238149
Spencer237531
Fountain233750
Starke229859
Owen221059
Sullivan219043
Fulton207645
Jay202832
Carroll196522
Orange190556
Perry189139
Vermillion179644
Rush177027
Franklin171635
Tipton171547
Parke153616
Pike141234
Blackford137832
Pulaski122948
Newton122436
Benton109215
Brown105743
Crawford105116
Martin92515
Warren87615
Switzerland8308
Union73510
Ohio58211
Unassigned0428

Ohio Coronavirus Cases

Data is updated nightly.

Cases: 1122104

Reported Deaths: 20467
CountyCasesDeaths
Franklin1302141493
Cuyahoga1171052259
Hamilton823021259
Montgomery534221059
Summit488431014
Lucas43716832
Butler39925614
Stark33777937
Lorain25975509
Warren24887312
Mahoning22677612
Lake21448396
Clermont20360260
Delaware19105138
Licking16838227
Trumbull16770491
Fairfield16750207
Medina15818276
Greene15497254
Clark14336308
Portage13410218
Wood13332201
Allen12037245
Richland11722213
Miami10993228
Wayne9249227
Columbiana9195236
Muskingum9118137
Pickaway8735123
Tuscarawas8710254
Marion8697140
Erie8116166
Ashtabula7270179
Hancock7043134
Ross7011165
Geauga6946153
Scioto6665108
Belmont6207179
Lawrence5912104
Union590449
Jefferson5722162
Huron5624122
Sandusky5473130
Darke5436130
Seneca5376128
Washington5360111
Athens526360
Auglaize506987
Mercer490585
Shelby480997
Knox4609112
Madison447266
Ashland442698
Defiance438499
Fulton435675
Putnam4351104
Crawford4108111
Brown409462
Preble3944107
Logan391679
Clinton388666
Ottawa375381
Highland364968
Williams356178
Champaign348060
Guernsey329754
Jackson321154
Perry298350
Morrow294543
Fayette288150
Hardin279065
Henry276967
Coshocton272561
Holmes2725102
Van Wert251765
Adams249158
Gallia248950
Pike244537
Wyandot235257
Hocking222263
Carroll200649
Paulding179342
Meigs151040
Noble137739
Monroe137445
Harrison115138
Morgan111624
Vinton87217
Unassigned03
Fort Wayne
Clear
68° wxIcon
Hi: 89° Lo: 64°
Feels Like: 68°
Angola
Clear
68° wxIcon
Hi: 87° Lo: 62°
Feels Like: 68°
Huntington
Clear
67° wxIcon
Hi: 87° Lo: 62°
Feels Like: 67°
Decatur
Clear
68° wxIcon
Hi: 88° Lo: 64°
Feels Like: 68°
Van Wert
Clear
71° wxIcon
Hi: 88° Lo: 65°
Feels Like: 71°
The summer heat sticks around as we start the work week. Make sure to stay hydrated. Stay inside in the air conditioning or in the shade as much as possible to stay cool.
WFFT Radar
WFFT Temperatures
WFFT National

Community Events