America's coronavirus reopening debate comes down to how much a human life is worth, New York governor says

CNN's Chris Cuomo argues that the people rushing to reopen the country should be careful what they wish for.

Posted: May 5, 2020 7:01 PM
Updated: May 5, 2020 7:01 PM

New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo on Tuesday said debates on how soon states should ease social distancing restrictions come down to the value of human life -- and that policymakers are avoiding saying so explicitly.

Cuomo, whose state by far has the most recorded coronavirus cases, reacted Tuesday to projections that the country's coronavirus death rate will soar because many states are easing restrictions now.

"The fundamental question, which we're not articulating, is how much is a human life worth?" Cuomo said at a news conference.

"The faster we reopen, the lower the economic cost. But, the higher the human cost, because (of) more lives lost," Cuomo said in a news conference. "That ... is the decision we are really making."

The US could now see 134,475 coronavirus deaths by early August, according to a model from the University of Washington's Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation. That's nearly double the model's prediction just last week of 74,000 deaths.

Americans' increased mobility, as restrictions are lifted, is a reason for the projected increase, the institute's director, Dr. Christopher Murray, said Monday.

Also, an internal Trump administration document obtained by The New York Times projected that cases and deaths will rise in the next weeks, with the death toll reaching 3,000 daily victims by June 1.

In the past two weeks, governors across the country introduced plans for phased reopenings amid mounting pressure from residents and businesses who are fearful of devastating economic impacts of lockdowns.

But easing restrictions now may come with a heavy price.

"It's the balance of something that's a very difficult choice," Dr. Anthony Fauci, the country's leading infectious disease expert, told CNN Monday night. "How many deaths and how much suffering are you willing to accept to get back to what you want to be some form of normality, sooner rather than later?"

At least 42 states will have eased restrictions by this coming Sunday, ranging from simply opening state parks to allowing some businesses to restart. That includes California -- the first state to implement a sweeping stay-at-home order -- where some stores will be allowed to reopen this week.

Tracking coronavirus cases in the US

So far, the US has recorded more than 1,192,119 infections and at least 70,115 deaths. Over the weekend, parks in New York City and Atlanta drew crowds as residents began venturing out of their homes. In the city of Miami Beach, more than 7,300 warnings were issued to people who weren't wearing face covers, while more than 470 warnings were given to those who failed to practice social distancing.

New York has said it could reopen nonessential businesses in phases starting this month, assuming daily cases continue to trend downward. Cuomo said he would pause that plan if cases rose.

The answers to your coronavirus questions

Poll: Majority prioritizes preventing illness over economy

A majority of Americans who answered a Monmouth University poll, meanwhile, indicated they prioritize preventing illnesses over long-term economic concerns.

In the poll, conducted Thursday though Monday, adults were asked which should be the more important factor in deciding whether to lift outbreak restrictions -- ensuring as few people as possible get sick from the coronavirus, or ensuring the economy doesn't enter a deep and lengthy downturn.

About 56% answered the former; 33% said the latter; 9% said both equally. The poll of 808 adults in the United States has a margin of error of +/- 3.5 percentage points, Monmouth said Tuesday.

More vaccine candidates tested in the US

Researchers continue to race for a potential coronavirus vaccine -- and another group of candidates is being tested on people in the United States.

US pharmaceutical giant Pfizer and German biotechnology company BioNTech have begun testing four coronavirus vaccine candidates in humans in New York and Maryland, the companies said Tuesday.

The trial had already started in patients in Germany last week. The Phase 1/2 study is designed to test the safety, effectiveness and best dose level of the four vaccine candidates.

The first stage of the US trial will enroll up to 360 healthy adults, starting with ages 18 to 55 and eventually including ages 65 to 85, the companies said.

These companies aren't the first with a vaccine program this far along.

The US National Institutes of Health started human testing of one vaccine candidate in the United States in March. In the United Kingdom, Oxford University's Jenner Institute began testing its vaccine candidate in humans in April.

The World Health Organization says 108 potential Covid-19 vaccines are in development around the world -- up from 102 on April 30. Eight of the potential vaccine programs have been approved for clinical trials, WHO says.

Fauci, a member of the White House's coronavirus task force, last week suggested January as a potential date for a vaccine, but vaccines typically take years to produce.

Meanwhile, researchers may be learning more about how soon Covid-19 spread outside China.

Doctors at a Paris hospital say they've found evidence that a patient who was there in December was infected with Covid-19. The man had not been to China.

If verified, this finding would show that the virus was already circulating in Europe at that time -- well before the first known cases were diagnosed in France or hotspot Italy.

The first official reports of Covid-19 in France had come on January 24, in two people who had a history of travel to Wuhan, China.

How governors are moving forward

California was one of the states where crowds gathered over the weekend as thousands of protesters descended on the state's Capitol and an Orange County beach to protest social distancing orders.

The governor on Monday announced retail shops in the state -- including clothing stores, florists and bookstores -- can begin to reopen Friday, after health officials said the state was meeting important metrics including sufficient test and tracing capacity.

Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti said he didn't think his city would reopen this week, saying Monday that despite the governor's announcement, different parts of the state may see different timelines for reopening.

In Michigan, Gov. Gretchen Whitmer said the lockdown will continue "until at least May 15," warning that reopening the state too soon could lead to a second shutdown.

Kentucky Gov. Andy Beshear, who will let construction and manufacturing businesses reopen May 11 as part of a phased reopening plan, said Monday the numbers in Kentucky are "really steady," even with more testing.

In Mississippi, Gov. Tate Reeves has amended his "safer at home" order, allowing outdoor gatherings of up to 20 people starting Thursday.

Saying he knows the virus doesn't do well in the sun or heat, Reeves added, "to be outdoors is about the safest place you can be." While lab tests in the US have shown the virus "dies the quickest in the presence of direct sunlight," the World Health Organization has said "you can catch COVID-19, no matter how sunny or hot the weather is."

Reeves' plan also allows dining service in restaurants, as long as the institutions follow guidelines provided by the state, including a mandatory deep cleaning.

"I don't want to wait if there are steps that we believe we can safely take now to ease the burden on Mississippians fighting this virus," he said.

This is where states stand on reopening

Protests against masks

As health officials and businesses navigate safe reopenings, many communities -- and the federal government -- have urged Americans to wear face coverings when they're in public. In parts of the US, it's required.

But those guidelines have also seen pushback -- including last week at Michigan's Capitol, where hundreds of protesters showed up, most of whom were not covering their faces.

On Friday, a security guard was shot in the head and killed after telling a customer at a Michigan Family Dollar store to wear a face mask. The governor required face masks in enclosed public spaces in late April. Three people have been charged.

In Stillwater, Oklahoma, an emergency proclamation issued to require face masks in stores and restaurants was amended a day later after store employees were "threatened with physical violence and showered with verbal abuse," Stillwater City Manager Norman McNickle said in a statement.

And in San Diego County, a supermarket customer wore a Ku Klux Klan-style hood to cover his face and only removed it at the cashier's desk, despite having been asked to do so multiple times before, CNN affiliate KSWB reported.

Indiana Coronavirus Cases

Data is updated nightly.

Confirmed Cases: 116549

Reported Deaths: 3577
CountyConfirmedDeaths
Marion21322766
Lake10566323
Elkhart6623111
St. Joseph6488109
Allen6244203
Hamilton4893109
Vanderburgh365231
Hendricks2741123
Monroe259836
Tippecanoe248313
Johnson2328124
Clark222757
Porter215447
Delaware196062
Cass19509
Vigo183527
Madison167075
LaPorte144440
Floyd137063
Warrick133039
Howard131363
Kosciusko121817
Bartholomew117057
Marshall100724
Boone98146
Dubois97919
Hancock93043
Grant92534
Noble91532
Henry80326
Wayne76114
Jackson7589
Morgan72438
Shelby67429
Daviess67228
Dearborn66428
LaGrange63811
Clinton60214
Harrison58224
Putnam57912
Gibson5225
Knox5179
Lawrence51229
Montgomery51121
White48614
DeKalb48311
Decatur45839
Miami4363
Greene42635
Fayette42213
Jasper3962
Steuben3857
Scott37711
Sullivan33712
Posey3350
Jennings31412
Franklin30925
Clay3015
Ripley2988
Orange28824
Whitley2766
Carroll27513
Wabash2688
Adams2663
Washington2661
Starke2647
Wells2634
Jefferson2483
Spencer2463
Fulton2412
Huntington2363
Tipton22722
Perry21913
Randolph2167
Jay1850
Newton17311
Owen1691
Martin1660
Rush1554
Pike1511
Vermillion1300
Fountain1272
Blackford1193
Pulaski1131
Crawford1070
Brown1043
Parke1002
Benton870
Union790
Ohio787
Switzerland690
Warren401
Unassigned0226

Ohio Coronavirus Cases

Data is updated nightly.

Confirmed Cases: 150009

Reported Deaths: 4740
CountyConfirmedDeaths
Franklin26872607
Cuyahoga17437656
Hamilton13158315
Montgomery7809163
Lucas7303364
Butler6022111
Summit5304252
Marion309647
Warren308349
Mahoning3065281
Stark2872175
Pickaway265344
Lorain231186
Delaware225920
Fairfield210553
Columbiana193180
Licking192763
Trumbull1888132
Wood186672
Clark179940
Clermont172523
Lake162851
Medina146739
Greene145332
Allen143769
Miami143651
Portage113966
Mercer112218
Erie94347
Tuscarawas93120
Wayne93168
Richland88819
Ross88424
Madison82312
Darke79942
Belmont72127
Geauga72049
Hancock71010
Athens6782
Ashtabula65948
Lawrence65822
Shelby64510
Auglaize6079
Putnam60323
Sandusky57620
Huron5467
Union5382
Scioto5057
Seneca48014
Ottawa46830
Preble43515
Muskingum4103
Holmes3879
Jefferson3364
Henry31414
Logan3123
Champaign3073
Clinton30013
Perry2979
Defiance29211
Brown2882
Knox28415
Washington26023
Jackson2586
Morrow2582
Hardin25513
Fulton2441
Ashland2394
Crawford2386
Coshocton23411
Fayette2316
Highland2303
Wyandot21212
Williams2093
Gallia19113
Pike1910
Meigs17510
Guernsey1698
Hocking1649
Carroll1527
Adams1314
Van Wert1193
Monroe11018
Paulding1100
Harrison633
Morgan470
Vinton473
Noble300
Unassigned00
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