Tunisia Fast Facts

Here's a look at Tunisia, a country in northern African. Tunisia borders Algeria, ...

Posted: Sep 1, 2018 7:58 AM
Updated: Sep 1, 2018 7:58 AM

Here's a look at Tunisia, a country in northern African. Tunisia borders Algeria, Libya and the Mediterranean Sea.

About Tunisia:
(from the CIA World Factbook)
Area: 163,610 sq km, slightly larger than the US state of Georgia

Africa

Arab Spring

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Middle East and North Africa

Moncef Marzouki

Northern Africa

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Prime ministers

Protests and demonstrations

Tunisia

2015 Tunisia museum attack

Bardo Museum

Crime, law enforcement and corrections

Criminal offenses

Destinations and attractions

Museums and galleries

National security

Shootings

Terrorism

Terrorist attacks

Travel and tourism

Unrest, conflicts and war

Crimes against persons

Government and public administration

Government bodies and offices

International relations and national security

Museums, gardens and historical sites

Political Figures - Intl

Terrorism and counter-terrorism

2015 Tunisia hotel attack

Tunis

Fast Facts

Beji Caid Essebsi

Criminal law

Law and legal system

Resignations

Sentencing

Civil unrest

Muslim people

Population and demographics

Society

Continents and regions

Demographic groups

Heads of government

Mediterranean Sea

Oceans and Seas (by name)

Physical locations

Population: 11,403,800 (July 2017 est.)

Median age: 32.7 years

Capital: Tunis

Ethnic groups: Arab 98%, European 1%, Jewish and other 1%

Religion: Sunni Muslim 99.1%, other 1% (includes Christian, Jewish, Shia Muslim and Baha'i)

GDP (purchasing power parity): $135.4 billion (2017 est.)

GDP per capita: $11,800 (2017 est.)

Unemployment: 15.9% (2017 est.)

Other Facts:
Tunisia is predominantly Sunni Muslim.

Women in Tunisia enjoy some of the greatest rights and freedoms in the Arab world.

Tunisia's 2011 mass popular uprising, dubbed the "Jasmine Revolution," gave rise to the Arab Spring, the grass-roots movement that toppled autocratic leaders and promoted freedom and democracy across the Arabic-speaking region in North Africa and the Middle East.

Tunisia is one of the countries impacted by the migrant crisis, which has seen unprecedented numbers of people trying to reach Europe via the Mediterranean since 2015. Tunisia is often used as a starting point by migrants, who often make the journey in overcrowded, makeshift boats.

Timeline:
1574 - The Ottoman Empire takes control of Tunisia.

1881 - Tunisia becomes a French protectorate.

1955 - France allows Tunisia some self-governance.

March 20, 1956 - Tunisia achieves full independence from France.

1957 - Tunisia becomes a republic, with Habib Bourguiba as president.

June 1959 - Tunisia ratifies its constitution.

November 1959 - Habib Bourguiba is formally elected president.

March 1975 - Bourguiba is named president for life.

November 7, 1987 - Prime Minister Zine el Abidine Ben Ali assumes the presidency after overthrowing Bourguiba in a bloodless coup and declaring him medically unfit to rule. Ben Ali is elected president five times: in 1989, 1994, 1999, 2004 and 2009.

December 17, 2010 - According to locals, Mohamed Bouazizi, a 26-year-old fruit and vegetable vendor, sets himself on fire in protest after police try to confiscate his belongings. He dies on January 4, 2011.

Late December 2010-Early January 2011 - Bouazizi's act of self-immolation sparks widespread protests over rising unemployment rates, poverty levels, inflation and government repression and corruption.

January 14, 2011 - President Ben Ali flees the country for Saudi Arabia. Prime Minister Mohamed Ghannouchi takes over in his absence. This period is called the "Jasmine Revolution," which marks the beginning of and inspiration for the Arab Spring.

January 15, 2011 - Speaker of Parliament Fouad Mebazaa is sworn in as interim president. Mebazaa asks Prime Minister Mohamed Ghannouchi to form a national unity government.

January 18, 2011 - Mebazaa and Ghannouchi resign from the Constitutional Democratic Rally (RCD), which was the ruling party of former president Zine el Abedine Ben Ali. This is a move seen as a gesture to placate angry street demonstrators and keep the unity government afloat.

January 20, 2011 - Other ministers for the interim government also resign from the RCD.

January 30, 2011 - Sheikh Rachid Ghannouchi, leader of the Ennahda party, returns to Tunisia after 22 years of exile.

February 27, 2011 - Prime Minister Mohamed Ghannouchi resigns. Tunisia's interim president selects Al-Baji Qa'ed Al-Sebsi as the new prime minister.

May 21, 2011 - Juan Mendez, the United Nations special rapporteur on torture, says that at least 300 people were killed and 700 injured during the Tunisian uprising in December and January.

June 14, 2011 - Interim Prime Minister Al-Sebsi announces that former President Ben Ali will be tried in absentia on charges relating to corruption and a stash of guns and drugs found in the presidential palace.

June 20, 2011 - After a one-day trial, former president Ben Ali and his wife are convicted of corruption in absentia. They are each sentenced to 35 years in prison and fined 91 million dinars ($65 million).

July 4, 2011 - After another one-day trial, Ben Ali is convicted of having marijuana and other illegal drugs, archaeological artifacts and weapons in the presidential palace. He is sentenced to 15.5 years in prison. Both Ben Ali's trial and sentencing are conducted in absentia.

October 23, 2011 - Tunisia holds the first national elections since its independence in 1956, to seat the new 217-member National Constituent Assembly. The moderate Islamist Ennahda Party, led by Rachid Ghannouchi, wins a majority of seats.

December 13, 2011 - Moncef Marzouki is sworn in as president of Tunisia.

May 23, 2012 - Prosecutors say they will seek a death sentence for Ben Ali, now charged in absentia with ordering the killings of anti-government demonstrators.

June 13, 2012 - Ben Ali is sentenced to life in prison for his role in the deaths of protesters between December 2010 and January 2011. Saudi Arabia does not extradite him.

February 6, 2013 - Opposition leader Chokri Belaid is shot and killed in front of his house as he is leaving for work. In response to widespread protests following Belaid's death, Prime Minister Hamadi Jebali announces he will dissolve parliament and form a caretaker government until new elections can be held.

February 19, 2013 - Prime Minister Hamadi Jebali resigns.

February 22, 2013 - Interior Minister Ali Larayedh is chosen by the ruling party, Ennahda, to be the new prime minister.

July 25, 2013 - Opposition leader Mohammed Al-Brahmi is fatally shot outside his home, setting off mass protests as a second Tunisian opposition leader is assassinated in almost six months.

August 6, 2013 - Tens of thousands of people protest in Tunis in hopes of dissolving the Constituent Assembly.

September 28, 2013 - Tunisia's governing party, Ennahda, agrees to resign and hand power over to an independent caretaker government until after elections.

October 23, 2013 - Talks intended to select the caretaker government are postponed due to violence and protests.

December 14, 2013 - Mehdi Jomaa, Tunisia's minister of industry, is selected to serve as caretaker prime minister until the elections, expected in 2014.

January 9, 2014 - Prime Minister Larayedh resigns to allow for the caretaker government to be run by Mehdi Jomaa.

January 26, 2014 - The National Constituent Assembly ratifies a new constitution.

January 28, 2014 - Islamist party Ennahda formally hands over power to the caretaker government, led by Prime Minister Mehdi Jomaa.

October 26, 2014 - Tunisians vote in parliamentary elections, the first since the 2011 revolution. More than 100 political parties have put up candidates for one of 217 seats in the People's Assembly.

November 23, 2014 - The first free presidential election heads to a December run-off as challenger Beji Caid Essebsi receives only a few more percentage points than incumbent President Moncef Marzouki.

December 22, 2014 - Beji Caid Essebsi is elected president with 55% of the vote, according to state-run media. Marzouki receives 44% of the vote.

January 5, 2015 - Habib Essid is nominated as prime minister and tasked with forming a new government.

March 18, 2015 - A terrorist attack on the Bardo Museum in Tunis leaves at least 23 dead, many of whom were foreign tourists. The hostage siege ends when security forces kill two of the attackers. President Essebsi later confirms that a third person took part in the museum terror attack and is on the run. Previously, two suspects had been identified -- Yassine Labidi and Saber Khachnaou -- though it wasn't immediately clear if they were the pair killed at the museum by Tunisian security forces. ISIS claims responsibility for the attack.

June 26, 2015 - A gunman kills at least 38 people at a beachfront Tunisian hotel, the same day terrorists behead a man in France and bomb a mosque in Kuwait. ISIS claims responsibility for the attacks in Tunisia and Kuwait.

July 4, 2015 - President Essebsi declares a state of emergency, saying another attack such as last week's terrorist massacre at a beach hotel would "cause the country to collapse."

October 9, 2015 - The Tunisian National Dialogue Quartet is awarded the Nobel Peace Prize for its "decisive contribution to the building of a pluralistic democracy in the country in the wake of the Jasmine Revolution of 2011."

November 24, 2015 - Twelve people are killed when a bus carrying members of Tunisia's presidential guard explodes in Tunis, according to the Interior Ministry. A suspected suicide bomber also dies. ISIS releases a statement the following day claiming responsibility.

January 22, 2016 - Tunisia's government announces a nationwide curfew as it counters demonstrations over a scarcity of jobs -- protests that come five years after similar complaints in Tunisia spurred the first Arab Spring revolution. France also announces a 1 billion euro aid package over five years to help Tunisia tackle its economic and social challenges.

July 30, 2016 - Tunisia's parliament passes a no-confidence vote against Prime Minister Habib Essid.

August 3, 2016 - President Essebsi names Youssef Chahed as prime minister.

June 4, 2018 - More than 100 die after a boat carrying migrants sinks off the Tunisian coast, marking the highest death toll in any single migration attempt of the year, according to the International Organization for Migration (IOM).

Indiana Coronavirus Cases

Data is updated nightly.

Cases: 697533

Reported Deaths: 13138
CountyCasesDeaths
Marion951321706
Lake50779930
Allen38511669
Hamilton33981404
St. Joseph33279535
Elkhart26810431
Vanderburgh21931393
Tippecanoe21440212
Johnson17325371
Porter17012297
Hendricks16631308
Clark12592190
Madison12223335
Vigo12089243
Monroe11237166
LaPorte10601204
Delaware10241182
Howard9555211
Kosciusko8999112
Hancock7842137
Bartholomew7797152
Warrick7657155
Floyd7501175
Wayne6846196
Grant6724167
Boone647399
Morgan6335137
Dubois6052117
Marshall5709108
Cass5657102
Dearborn564674
Henry5545100
Noble532583
Jackson489469
Shelby474095
Lawrence4305118
Gibson424988
Harrison424870
Montgomery414486
Clinton413153
DeKalb402583
Huntington371880
Whitley371039
Miami369565
Knox363589
Steuben358457
Putnam350560
Wabash344677
Jasper341646
Adams336652
Ripley332368
Jefferson306479
White305954
Daviess287999
Wells283580
Decatur278092
Fayette276562
Greene268685
Posey267333
Scott258553
Clay250744
LaGrange249970
Randolph233379
Washington228429
Spencer226731
Jennings223947
Fountain207245
Sullivan207041
Starke199352
Owen190856
Fulton188939
Jay184829
Carroll184520
Perry178536
Orange175552
Rush169324
Vermillion165343
Franklin164435
Tipton160343
Parke143416
Blackford131730
Pike129634
Pulaski112245
Newton102334
Brown98840
Crawford96814
Benton94513
Martin81915
Warren78315
Switzerland7678
Union69410
Ohio55311
Unassigned0405

Ohio Coronavirus Cases

Data is updated nightly.

Cases: 1037600

Reported Deaths: 18827
CountyCasesDeaths
Franklin1203461345
Cuyahoga1048492040
Hamilton774221164
Montgomery49484984
Summit44494904
Lucas39105757
Butler37437566
Stark31094890
Lorain23775467
Warren23688291
Mahoning20622581
Lake19698360
Clermont19305226
Delaware17783130
Licking15970205
Fairfield15493195
Trumbull15377458
Medina14662255
Greene14484233
Clark13433287
Wood12547182
Portage12144193
Allen11216229
Richland10899197
Miami10455211
Muskingum8639127
Columbiana8478225
Wayne8451209
Pickaway8388120
Tuscarawas8311239
Marion8297135
Erie7415153
Ross6636145
Hancock6595123
Geauga6449146
Ashtabula6355163
Scioto625299
Belmont5518158
Union550847
Lawrence5435102
Huron5229112
Darke5225121
Jefferson5210147
Sandusky5087118
Seneca5048118
Washington5029107
Athens493654
Auglaize470484
Mercer467884
Shelby453289
Knox4332108
Putnam417298
Madison416157
Ashland408986
Fulton402165
Defiance395096
Brown383855
Crawford3819100
Logan369676
Preble367995
Clinton356859
Ottawa351978
Highland344858
Williams317574
Champaign317055
Jackson304451
Guernsey303348
Perry286449
Fayette276348
Morrow272639
Henry261266
Hardin261063
Coshocton255957
Holmes251499
Van Wert237462
Gallia232146
Pike230931
Adams226151
Wyandot224153
Hocking207057
Carroll187746
Paulding167538
Meigs140838
Noble131737
Monroe128441
Morgan105722
Harrison104836
Vinton80913
Unassigned01
Fort Wayne
Cloudy
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Hi: 55° Lo: 46°
Feels Like: 43°
Angola
Cloudy
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Hi: 54° Lo: 45°
Feels Like: 44°
Huntington
Cloudy
47° wxIcon
Hi: 55° Lo: 46°
Feels Like: 43°
Fort Wayne
Cloudy
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Feels Like: 43°
Lima
Cloudy
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Feels Like: 51°
Rain showers continue Saturday evening, as will a few thunderstorms. Overnight, rain will taper off a little as temperatures drop into the mid 40s. On Sunday, rain chances return in late morning and last much of the day. Temperatures max out in the mid 50s and winds will be brisk at times.
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